New Study Reveals Deadly Pathogen Not Present in Pet Salamanders in the United States (Photo Captions)


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Caption: Researchers swabbing an emperor newt at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park. Emperor newts belong to a genus of newts from Asia that are currently subjected to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s moratorium on salamander imports because of the risk that they may carry the deadly salamander fungal disease, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal). (Photo by Brian Gratwicke)


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Caption: Asian newts are popular as pets and common in the trade. They’re also potential carriers of the deadly salamander fungal disease, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal). (Photo by Brian Gratwicke)



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Caption: The red-spotted newt is a species native to the United States that is highly susceptible to the deadly salamander fungal disease, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal). (Photo by Brian Gratwicke)


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Caption: The spotted salamander is a native U.S. species. Members of this genus are popular as pets. (Photo by Brian Gratwicke)